tate

Tate

Art galleries in UK: #TateBritain , #TateModern , @tateliverpool & @tatestives. We aim to increase everyone's enjoyment and understanding of art.

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‘Humour is a way to put the finger on the wound. It’s a delicate way to deal with traumatic experiences.’ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ Kiluanji Kia Henda is an Angolan artist based in Luanda, and was in his twenties when the Angolan civil war ended in 2002. Kia Henda documents his country’s history in an inventive and imaginary manner, blending fiction and reality. ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ 🔍 Watch our Instagram TV to see the full interview! ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ 👀 You can see Kia Henda’s work ‘Rusty Mirage (The City Skyline)’ 2013 on free display @tateliverpool.
💥Tickets now on sale for BMW #TateLive Exhibition: Anne Imhof! Constructing atmospheric environments inhabited by groups of collaborators, Imhof will take over Tate Modern's Tanks for ten days and five nights. During the day, wander around Imhof’s free display of paintings, sculptures and architectural interventions. See the space come alive with music, lights and live performances in the ticketed evening events, now on sale - link in bio. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ From 22-31 March at Tate Modern.
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Happy Valentine's Day to the lovers out there ❤️🧡💛💚💙💜 ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ This image depicts Sappho and Erinna, the ancient Greek poets who were associated with the island of Lesbos, giving us the word ‘lesbian’. Simeon Solomon was attracted to men at a time when male homosexuality was illegal, so this same-sex female couple may be a covert way of referring to his own desires. #LGBThistorymonth Simeon Solomon, Sappho and Erinna in a Garden at Mytilene 1864
One month left to see #FernandLéger at @TateLiverpool.  New Times, New Pleasures is the first major UK exhibition dedicated to Léger’s work in thirty years, celebrating the artist’s desire to make art part of everyday life. Fernand Léger, Trois femmes sur fond rouge 1927 © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2018. Image courtesy Cyrille Cauvet/Musée d’art moderne et contemporain de Saint-Étienne Métropole.
‘The idea of Eden, or “the garden” where all wild beings live together in peace and harmony, is interesting to me. This painting was made by two Flemish guys who never traveled outside Europe, so their rendition of wild beasts like tigers and lions (along with many animals belonging to the domestic landscape) echoes the colonial premise of terra incognita (the places on the map where Roman and Medieval cartographers used to write HIC SVNT LEONES - “here are lions”) being there for the taking, as though to “know” (and conquer) the land would dispel the lions somehow. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ The biblical story of Eve is also the central narrative in which woman - in Jerome's translation - becomes synonymous with “shame”, and with sin. I'm also interested in the serpent as the harbinger of knowledge, chaotic neutral and imbued full of the cyclical, spiral nature of life and death: the secret truth at the heart of everything, both feminine and masculine. In my reading the snake is not evil or fearful, but something to respect and acknowledge as part of life. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ As for Eden, I would prefer to think of it as a temporary autonomous zone produced by desire and necessity, rather than a walled garden whose pleasures are available to the obedient few.’ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ - @jessedarling ________ #ArtNow artist Jesse Darling is taking over our Instagram, exploring the inspiration behind their exhibition at Tate Britain — The Ballad of Saint Jerome. Free entry. Link in bio. Image credits: Jesse Darling, Bird 2018, photographed by Tom Carter Jesse Darling, The lion and batman in the garden (temporary relief) [detail] 2018, photographed by Tim Bowditch Jesse Darling, Snake 2018, photographed by Tom Carter ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀ Peter Paul Rubens and Jan Brueghel, The garden of Eden with the fall of Man (Genesis 3:4), ca. 1615, The Hague, Koninklijk Kabinet van Schilderijen
‘Pere Ubu (sometimes translated as King Turd) is a gross, hubristic, infantile, self-serving and abject buffoon based on the then-15 year-old Alfred Jarry’s physics teacher, and later described as a metaphor for the modern man. When Ubu hit the stage seven years later in the play Ubu Roi, he incited a riot in the stalls. Ubu struts around in a cardboard costume riding a cardboard horse and carrying a toilet brush as his “attribute” (which seems a quintessentially modern object). In his original stage instructions Jarry specified that at intervals throughout the performance “a suitably costumed person would enter, as in puppet shows, to put up signs indicating the locations of the various scenes,” and that there should be nothing in the set design to specify the time or location of the play’s setting. This transparency of narrative production feels influential to me. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ I also encountered Ubu when I was 15 and thought it was really funny, but now I’m interested to read that it is considered by some to be the beginning of modernism in the 20th century. The total irreverence of the satire is perhaps possible only from a certain positionality as regards its subject, but it feels to me more politically and aesthetically influential than all the punk and counterculture I came in contact with later on. Precarious constructions, poor materials and folk wisdom exist in a dialectical relationship with engineering, architecture and science, and this is where it starts getting ‘modern’. And as a white European, I have to acknowledge that this dialectic formed my understanding of the world - which now seems like such a partial and skewed way to see things.’ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ - @jessedarling ________ #ArtNow artist Jesse Darling is taking over our Instagram, exploring the inspiration behind their exhibition at Tate Britain — The Ballad of Saint Jerome. Free entry. Link in bio. Image credits: Jesse Darling, Shamed cabinet 2018 Jesse Darling, Icarus Does the Most 2018, photographed by Tim Bowditch Ustheater Opera and Performance of Alfred Jarry’s Ubu Roi
‘The last image is from a Brothers Grimm fairytale, “Thorn Rose”, illustrated by Errol le Cain. The story is a version of sleeping beauty. It seems that folk tales follow the same patterns all over the world. Fairy tales and folk tales travel through speech in the oral tradition (like the idea of the lion travelled through images) and their main audience is children. When you encounter something from such a young age I think it informs the way you see the world - fairy tales are full of ideology both explicit and unconscious. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In folklore and in Freudian analysis, the forest is the wild realm of secrets, death - and some say femininity - where the fairytale hero goes to be tested. The forest is outside reason, outside cultivation; it is the dark of the unconscious or unacknowledged. Saint Jerome is often seen in the forest. In my work I wanted it to be, among other things, the “country of the sick” (as Susan Sontag described it) as seen from the “country of the well.”’ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ - @jessedarling ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ________ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ #ArtNow artist Jesse Darling is taking over our Instagram, exploring the inspiration behind their exhibition at Tate Britain — The Ballad of Saint Jerome. Free entry. Link in bio. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Image credits: Jesse Darling, The Ballad of Saint Jerome 2018, installation view, photographed by Tom Carter ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Jesse Darling, Relics of the lion wound 2018, photographed by Tim Bowditch ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Jesse Darling, Ascension device 2018, photographed by Tim Bowditch ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Errol Le Cain, Illustration taken from ‘Thorn Rose’ by the Brothers Grimm
‘Twin guardian lions can be seen as a very old “meme” that is likely to have originated in Han dynasty China, influenced by depictions and pelts of lions in trade with India or the Middle East. The lions don’t always resemble lions as we know them, since the stone and woodcutters had probably never seen a lion in the flesh (as was the case also with the medieval painters who depicted the legend of Saint Jerome). The lions end up looking like all kinds of different monsters, an image of an idea. Guardian lions - usually one male and one female - were thought to protect a building from harmful spirits. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ In thinking about the lion as an idea representing power to different people and in different ways, I wanted to think about all these histories of violence and exchange and hubris and accomplishment.’ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ - @jessedarling ________ #ArtNow artist Jesse Darling is taking over our Instagram, exploring the inspiration behind their exhibition at Tate Britain — The Ballad of Saint Jerome. Free entry. Link in bio. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Image credits: Jesse Darling, Sphinxes of the gate (Wounded sentry) 2018, photographed by Tom Carter ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Jesse Darling, Sphinxes of the gate (Pet sentry) 2018, photographed by Tim Bowditch ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Jesse Darling, Lion in wait for Saint Jerome and his medical kit (detail) 2018 ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Unknown, Two headless sphinxes at the entrance to the Amphipolis Tomb, Greek Culture Ministry
@jessedarling is taking over our account for the next two days, sharing their inspiration for the artwork in The Ballad of Saint Jerome. You can visit their Art Now exhibition at Tate Britain on display until 24 February. Free entry. ________ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ‘Much of this work has been inspired by the story of Saint Jerome and the lion, which goes like this: Jerome and his scholar brothers are studying together in the cloister when suddenly a lion shows up. The lion is roaring and seems rowdy so the monks go for the crossbow to kill it, but Jerome alone raises a hand: this lion is just wounded! Our hero approaches the lion to find a thorn in its paw, or a broken front leg – accounts vary – and he patches it up using his medical kit. From that day on, the grateful lion stays with him forever, instantly tame. Initially, I viewed this as a beautiful love story. Who doesn’t want their wound to be recognised? Wildness and woundedness go together. It’s rooted in a sort of promise that the institutional(ised) relationship will shelter one’s wildness from the world, though it’s in the vice versa that it becomes problematic: what does one lose by getting into bed with a scholar saint who promises healing? And what’s a lion doing in a library anyway?’ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ - @jessedarling ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ________ #ArtNow artist Jesse Darling is taking over our Instagram, exploring the inspiration behind their exhibition at Tate Britain: The Ballad of Saint Jerome. Free entry. Link in bio. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Image credits: Jesse Darling in their studio in Berlin, July 2018, photographed by Laura Braun Jesse Darling, Art Now: The Ballad of St Jerome 2018 (installation view), photographed by Tom Carter ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Jesse Darling, Lion in wait for Saint Jerome and his medical kit 2018, photographed by Tim Bowditch Fra Filippo Lippi and workshop, St Jerome and the Lion 1455-60, @NationalGallery Rogier van der Weyden, Saint Jerome in the Desert, between 1450 and 1465, @diadetroit
#WorkoftheWeek is Agnes Martin's 'I Love the Whole World' 1999. Agnes Martin described having ‘inspirations’ that catalysed the creation of each new work. Seeing the finished painting in her mind’s eye, she would translate this vision into reality, methodically measuring out the divisions of the canvas as she had seen them. However, as she said, ‘we can see perfectly, but we cannot do perfectly’, so while her ‘inspiration’ was perfect, the final painting always contained slight imperfections brought about by the human hand. Martin aimed at perfection in the full knowledge that she could not achieve it: ‘I hope I have made it clear that the work is about perfection as we are aware of it in our minds but that the paintings are very far from being perfect – completely removed in fact – as we ourselves are.’
Only a few weeks left to catch Alex Katz's free @artistrooms ' exhibition @tateliverpool , presenting the artist's modern take on the classical themes of portraiture, landscape, figure studies, marine scenes and flowers. 🌊🌼 Closes 10 March 2019. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Alex Katz in his first studio in Lincolnville, Maine 1974 / Alex Katz, Ocean View 1992 / Alex Katz, Penobscot 1999.
❗ Last chance ❗ to see the Hyundai Commission: #TaniaBruguera on free display in Tate Modern's Turbine Hall — using 'forced empathy', low frequency sound and heatproof flooring, Bruguera demonstrates the scale of the global migration crisis. Closes 24 February 2019.
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